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accused of plotting a terror attack on u.s. soil. a live report coming up. >>> nasa struggling to find its footing after retiring the shuttle program. we'll take a look at a new study suggesting that underfunding could threaten america's future in space. >> all three engines up and burning. two, one, zero and lift-off, the finalist off of atlantis on the shoulders of the space shuttle. america will continue the dream. jon: that was the final space shuttle launch july 8th, 2011 signaling the end of an era for nasa. federal funding for the space agency has fallen flat. it has come under constant threats of more cuts in recent years. a new study suggests that underfunding and lack of focus could lead to nasa's demise. despite the mars rover curiosity and president's calls for manned missions to mars, nasa appears to be losing its edge in space exploration? we have tom jones, four times former shuttle as snow naught for nasa and planetary scientist. what do you think of nasa's problems? at this point there are no plans to return humans to space until 2020, is that right, tom? >> americans are
of this world. right now nasa is revealing the latest discovery on mars. ready in welcome to brand-new hour of "happening now," i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. uncovering new knowledge about the red planet. today's announcement comes nearly four months after the six-wheeled robot landed in a giant crater. nasa unveiling the latest findings today as a gathering of scientists around the world come together. claudia cowen joins us by phone. >> reporter: this would be a game change err but most likely not. this may be a little overhyped after one scientist said that the data would be one for the record books. that was tweeted by curiosity itself through a twitter account run by nasa's jet propulsion lab. for the past few weeks nasa has had to real in expectations issuing a press release saying today's news quote will be the update about the first use of the rove verse full array of analytical instruments to inspect a drift of sandy soil. some say they may have uncovered methane, and that aliens may have been decomposing. the rover is working to identify organic compounds to see if mars can
. scientists want to analyze how the human body reacts to long-term exposure in orbit. this is part of nasa's larger plan to one day send man to mars but the journey, get this, takes eight months one way. so they must understand how the body reacts to those conditions. researchers already know it can affect eyesight. >> we discovered that some crewmembers are having some pressure in their intracain ya'll pressure, pressure in the vain system in their brains and spinal cord especially. that was causing in some crewmembers a vision impact. >> reporter: training for this mission starts early next year with the official launch date in the spring of 2015. jenna. jenna: pretty remarkable. when you think about the story, you wonder why can't we do the fiscal cliff thing? >> reporter: right. jenna: if we can put somebody in space for a year. >> reporter: we need to ask our lawmakers, right. jenna: casey, incredible story. gregg: you can put the man on the moon but you can't --. all right. researchers may have found what could be the earliest known dinosaur to walk the earth. the mysterious fossil f
at night revealing a planet that is really never in the dark. nasa releasing these pictures that were taken not by me, but by a special satellite called sumy npp. we're about to show you the united states, you can see it coming into frame, and you can see how the lights illuminating from the ground look a lot like the stars and the constellations we see when we look up at night. and here's a bird's eye view of egypt's nile river lit up by boats. yes, those are lights from boats. the reason these images are possible is because of a new sensor that is onboard the camera which stands for the national polar orbiting partnership. it was launched last year. it gives scientists -- and us -- a brand new way to observe what our planet looks like once the sun goes down. what do you think of that, jon? jon: that's cool. and atlanta really stands out in the shot of the sort of, you know, eastern seaboard. i don't know, it's kind of interesting. i was surprised that atlanta is so big and bright. >> reporter: atlanta and, of course, the northeast. and you can see there that sort of corridor up in new yor
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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